Monthly Archives: August 2020

Coronovirus: Alarming Drop in Mental Capacity

Coronavirus is making life difficult for everyone, but more so for those whose mental capacity is already reduced. Enforced social isolation increases the stresses on everyone and tends to make us feel more anxious, stressed, worried, sad, bored as well as lonely and often frustrated. Advisers report an alarming drop in the mental capacity of those who were previously reasonably ok.  

All of these are things which tend to reduce peoples ability to cope with life and to be able to make Lasting Powers of Attorney (which is our mission.) Whether the effects will be wholly lasting or not remains to be seen, but many people will slip beyond the point at which Lasting Powers of Attorney can be set up, leaving an application to the Court of Protection for a Deputyship as the only remaining route. Bear in mind that only financial Depoutyships are usually granted, leaving Health and Welfare matters in the hands of the Court – and that includes where people live Whether that application is made by the family or by Social Services, it is at the expense of the person suffering reduce mental capacity.

Experience has shown that it is not always easy for people to throw off the yoke of Deputyship even should they fully recover, and when the Deputy is a professional it is likely to be very expensive. Family members may find it difficult to cope with the bureaucratic and record-keeping issues associated with deputyship.

Obviously, everyone over 18 should have Lasting Powers of Attorney (do you?) as misfortune can strike at any time, but here are some tips from the NHS as to how to best keep up your, or a relative, or friends mental capacity:

1) Keep Socially Active

Clearly, that doesn’t mean what it used to. Phone calls, Facebook messages, video calls etc all help. Though the trouble is many older people won’t be up to speed on some of these, so will suffer more.

2) Talk About Your Worries

Very few people are NOT finding the current situation stressful. So talk about your worries and concerns, and encourage the vulnerable to share their worries with you. A worry shared is a worry halved as they say. A little reassurance goes a long way. The Government even has a Chatbot to talk about your worries – why not try it out?
https://api.whatsapp.com/send?phone=447860064422&text=hi

3. Help and Support Others

Just because you are feeling a bit down doesn’t mean that you can’t join Facebook and other groups and encourage other people. A friendly ear helps others feel it isn’t just them.

4. Finances and Regulations

If finances are a problem, or you are not sure what the recommendations are for social matters, check the Government website for advice. That is what it is there for.

5. Keep Physically Active

The fitter your body is, the more likely your mind is to stay fit too. Resist the urge to be a total couch potato, and get up and walk about. Maybe do some gentle stretches once an hour. Exercise will help you sleep too. Maybe find some gentle exercise videos on Youtube. If you can, do more walking than you would normally, or get on the bike if you are up to it.

6. Do things you enjoy

Reading, listening to music (my favourite), gardening, walking, running.

7) Don’t Listen to Negative Fake News

Go to the Government website o#r the BBC or the NHS for news and suggestions – don’t go to the more sensational newspapers who like to shock you, even if the copy under doesn’t match the sensational headline!

8) Relax

Relaxation techniques can help.

Those are just a few suggestions. if you are feeling really desperate, visit this page?
https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/urgent-support/


Contact us to organise Lasting Powers of Attorney before it is too late.